Jelly

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Spring (finally!) Ahhhh

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Softening Up for Summer!

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Softening Up for Summer!.

Oh My Chokecherry Jelly!

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I had full-blown berry fever. After picking several quarts of black raspberries (eating most and freezing some), I started wondering what other edibles may be scattered around my new property. I hoped these were currants, but after tasting one, I thought they must not be edible. A little research revealed these babies were a very popular staple of the pioneers and the Native Americans. They are chokecherries; probably named such because the taste will choke you, and the pits are toxic. However, when cooked down for jelly, or pitted and heavily sugared, chokecherries are supposed to be tasty! I had my doubts. But I was in foraging mode and felt like robbing the birds and teasing the mosquitoes with heavily deeted clothing. So off I went carrying a handy dandy berry bucket and gobbling up black raspberries on the way to the newly discovered chokecherries.

IMG_7237The bucket was half full, when I dumped it by mistake. Ugh. But lesson learned: bring scissors, and cut the entire cluster, that way if you do dump your cache, you can still pick up your losses.

IMG_7234The berries are found on bushes with bark that resembles a cherry tree; the fruit hanging in clusters like grapes. If you try one, be sure to spit out the poisonous pit. After loading up, I rinsed all the cherries and took them off the stems, ending up with about 4 cups. Next they went into a saucepan with a cup of water to be cooked down, mashing them with a potato masher after 15 or 20 minutes.

IMG_7263Then I drained them for the juice ending up with 1 1/3 cup, added 3 cups of sugar and began the boiling process. Instead of using pectin, I boiled this concoction for close to a half hour when it finally did its magic trick and thickened at 220 degrees F. I filled the prepared jars leaving ¼ inch headspace and processed in a hot water bath for ten minutes.

IMG_7265The jelly color is amazing, some of the prettiest jelly I’ve seen. Memories of breakfast buffets in Denmark flooded my mind, with their little crocks of jams and jellies and loads of breads and cheeses and bagels! Jellies are a fancy delicacy in the old world, made with all kinds of unusual fruits, but none better than chokecherries from my own back yard.

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Softening Up for Summer!

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Reading blogs this morning when I realized the sun was shining in on my living room make-over. I tried to get shots of it yesterday, but it was raining, and the flash kept washing out the pictures so they didn’t do justice to all the fussing I’d done. But the warm bath of sunshine called me to grab my camera and try again.  This is a bit more like it!

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I found these delightful little dogwood pillows at a thrift store last fall, and couldn’t resist!  Sweetest little things were under $3 and are backed with a baby pink quilted fabric.  IMG_8657

 Happy blooms from my friend Terri!  Friends who spread cheer with flowers.  Love ! And another thrift find: the blue vintage metal tray. Drum roll please: 99 cents. (Or was it 69 cents?…I can’t remember)

IMG_8658Cheerful mug my honey brought me from Germany 🙂

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Found the vintage ticking pillowcase on Etsy for six bucks. And the lighter one I found at a thrift store for under a dollar. But it was one long piece in a six-inch wide strip.  So I sewed it together to add to my collection of vintage ticking pillow covers!  More love!IMG_8666 IMG_8668

IMG_8645Happy Spring! Fresh and new all over!

 

 

 

Spring Kitchen Makeover!

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